Youth Justice

This neighborhood attorney has a heart for kids caught up in the criminal justice system

This neighborhood attorney has a heart for kids caught up in the criminal justice system

“They did the crime,” it has been said, “they do the time.” In this case, “they” are incarcerated or previously incarcerated women, specifically mothers either expecting a baby or with one or more children. And while the mothers have colored outside the lines enough to warrant imprisonment, their children have not.

Read the rest of this article from Lakewood Advocate Mag.

New Report Explores Intersections of Incarceration and Motherhood

Motherhood and Pregnancy Behind Bars - Cover

A report released today by the Texas Center for Justice and Equity (TCJE) highlights the experiences of mothers in Texas prisons and jails. “Motherhood and Pregnancy Behind Bars: Texas Must Rethink How It’s Treating Mothers and Families” urges leaders to protect the lives and dignity of currently incarcerated women while taking real, viable steps to keep people out of the criminal legal system altogether.

Texas takes $30 million from troubled juvenile justice department to fund border initiative Operation Lone Star

Texas takes $30 million from troubled juvenile justice department to fund border initiative Operation Lone Star

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is now paying for his controversial border mission Operation Lone Star with money from the state’s cash-strapped Texas Juvenile Justice Department. About $31 million of the nearly half billion dollars he raked from a half dozen state agencies earlier this month to fund national guard troops on the southern border came from the state’s juvenile justice fund.

Texas juvenile justice leader departs with state agency at critical juncture

Texas juvenile justice leader departs with state agency at critical juncture

After four years at the helm of the beleaguered state agency, executive director Camille Cain’s departure comes at a pivotal time. Cain leaves TJJD while it faces critically low staffing levels and is being audited by the state’s Sunset Advisory Commission.

Read the rest of this article from Texas Public Radio.

Formerly Incarcerated Leaders to Gather for Community-Building Event in Dallas

Formerly Incarcerated Leaders to Gather for Community-Building Event in Dallas

On April 2, a group of formerly incarcerated and justice system-impacted Texans will convene in Dallas. The event, “From Prison to Power: Finding Your Voice After Incarceration,” is organized by the Texas Center for Justice and Equity’s Statewide Leadership Council (SLC) and partners

Read the rest of this press release here.

Kids of color are disproportionately punished in the Harris County juvenile justice system, a study shows

Kids of color are disproportionately punished in the Harris County juvenile justice system, a study shows

The Harris County juvenile justice system disproportionately punishes a small group of Black and brown kids more harshly than others, according to a study from Rice University Texas Policy Lab. Of the 42,000 kids who came into contact with the Harris County juvenile justice system between 2010 and 2019, most had only one interaction, according to the study. 

Press Advisory: Houston Event Will Highlight System-Impacted Leaders, Build Community for Formerly Incarcerated Locals

Press Advisory: Houston Event Will Highlight System-Impacted Leaders, Build Community for Formerly Incarcerated Locals

On January 29, a group of formerly incarcerated and justice system-impacted Texans will convene in Houston. The event, “From Prison to Power: Finding Your Voice After Incarceration,” is organized by the Texas Center for Justice and Equity’s Statewide Leadership Council (SLC) and partners.

Read the rest of this press advisory here.

These middle-aged Texans committed crimes as young teenagers. Should they get a second chance?

These middle-aged Texans committed crimes as young teenagers. Should they get a second chance?

For years, Demetrius Johnson, now 54, spent his days imagining what his life could have been if he had made different decisions at the age of 16. He describes it as if it actually happened to an alternate version of himself: A Demetrius Johnson who got a job at 18 and took care of his family. Who bought a two-bedroom house next door to his aunt, where he lived with his mother, his son and his son’s mother. Whose aunt helped turn the garage into an extra bedroom.

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